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Review: Yeedi K700’s quiet suction makes it perfect for apartments

Why vacuum when you can get a robot to do it for you?I totally get it. Cleaning your house takes

Review: Vivint’s home security system is a professionally-installed dream

When it comes to home security systems, there are a LOT of choices available these days. Companies like Ring and

Review: Nanoleaf’s $200 HomeKit-Enabled Hexagons Paint Your Walls With Color

Nanoleaf has been making wall-mounted HomeKit-connected lights since 2017 with the launch of the triangle-shaped Light Panels, which were followed

2020 27-Inch iMac Reviews: A Great Machine for Working From Home With Upgraded Camera, Speakers, Microphone and More

The 2020 27-inch iMac was announced earlier this week with updated 10th-generation Intel chips, new AMD 5000 graphics, a True

Review: The Wyze Cam Outdoor is good enough to show off

Be on the lookout for this wireless security camera bundle.If you pay any attention to the smart home space at

McAfee Total Protection Review: Everything you need

The McAfee name lives on!There's a reason that the name McAfee is synonymous with the best antivirus software. While McAfee

Review: Eve Cam Offers Privacy and Security With HomeKit Secure Video Integration

Apple with iOS 13 introduced HomeKit Secure Video functionality, which allows home security cameras that adopt support to offer integration

Review: Zendure’s Passport II Pro 61W Travel Adapter Can Power Just About Everything, Including a MacBook Pro

I often work away from home, and occasionally abroad, so I'm always looking for ways to slim down the number

Review: The Linksys AX6000 router is expensive and lacks top-notch security

A solid performer mostly marred by the lingering security issues and lack of features of the app.Mesh routers gained significant

Review: The ASUS ROG Phone 3 takes gaming phones to the next level

ASUS's Snapdragon 865+ monster isn't for everyone, but it certainly packs all the power mobile gamers crave.Of all the gaming

Review: Lenovo Flex 5 Chromebook strikes the perfect balance

Lenovo gives users exactly what they need without cluttering the Flex 5's experience.Chromebooks tend to fall on one of two

New EU Regulation Gives Developers More Protection and Transparency in App Store Review

App Store developers in the European Union now have more protections afforded to them following the passage of new regulations

Review: Ghost of Tsushima caps off the PS4 era in style

It's not the "Assassin's Creed in Japan" you were expecting, which is both to its advantage and detriment.Ghost of Tsushima

Nokia 5.3 Review: $199 really can buy a great smartphone

It does everything you could want from a smartphone, without excelling in any one particular area

Reviewing the ASUS ROG Phone II one year later

I am not a gamer. Well, let me clarify that; I’m not a “mobile gamer”. I’ve been gaming on PC and console for basically my entire life but mobile gaming has never really taken off for me.I’ve had top of the line Android and Apple phones capable of playing whatever games were out there. I’ve had an NVIDIA Shield TV that can play games from the Google Play Store. Hell, I even have a Nintendo Switch. For whatever reason, they just don’t do it for me.So, when I started my review of the ASUS ROG Phone II, I knew I was going to have to approach it a little bit differently. I can’t speak intelligently about the gaming performance of this phone, because frankly, I don’t have experience with Android gaming.I decided to look at it through a different lens. I might not be a gamer, but I am a “power user”. And as much as I hate that term, I do fit it. I’m on my phone for 7-8 hours a day working, entertaining myself, and keeping in contact with friends and family. Even though ASUS wants this to be known as the best gaming phone out there, I think they need to accept that they didn’t make the best gaming phone of 2019. They made the best phone of 2019. Period.While every phone manufacturer wants to market its device as “an experience” or a life-changing event, they’re just phones. They’re a collection of components that run Android and live in either our pocket or our hand. The ASUS ROG Phone II is exactly that, but it’s one of the devices that I feel ends up being more than the sum of its parts. Very few phones are able to jump this hurdle but the ROG Phone II does.So, what does that actually mean?Picture this: you’re in the carrier store looking for a new phone. Lined up on the wall you have the newest releases from Samsung, Apple, LG, and OnePlus. They’re all same-y looking with displays that cover the entire face of a phone, almost no bezels and bright screens. They’re sleek, they’re sexy, and they scream out to be held.The ROG Phone II is not that. It is huge and is unconcerned about being skinny or small. Its design is aggressive, not svelte. It is powerful and unapologetic about it.The 6.59-inch 120Hz AMOLED display isn’t the biggest on the market, but it’s close. But the phone feels absolutely massive in your hands because above and below that display are front-facing speakers.Between the beautiful display and the class-leading speakers, this is a media powerhouse. Sure, it’s great for gaming but if you watch videos on your phone, this is the phone you want. The speakers sound better than some Bluetooth speakers I’ve reviewed and max volume is insane. You could sit this thing down in a corner at a party, pump the volume and provide music for the whole crew. It’s that good.Poco F2 Pro ReviewAnd that display is excellent. While I was happy with the 90Hz options last year, the ROG Phone II pumps it up a notch to a 120Hz refresh display. That means the display is refreshing itself 120 times a second.The standard in the past has been 60Hz, or 60 times a second. This added refresh rate gives us silky smooth animations that makes everything feel faster and more fluid. While this is a feature that most can live without, I think it adds to the overall package in a way that most features can’t. It enhances everything else.Speaking of enhancements, the 6,000mAh battery means you can keep all of those enhancements enabled. Battery life is the biggest feature for me when selecting a device because nothing else really matters if my phone is dead halfway through the day, or if I’m unable to use it because it’s sitting on a charger.Simply stated, this is the best battery life I’ve ever seen on an Android device and comes second only to the Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max in my in-person testing.I don’t run benchmarks or do scientific battery testing because real people don’t do that either. In my experience I was getting 1.5 days of usage with close to 10 hours of screen-on-time. Again, take note that I’m not a gamer and mostly work in documents, read Reddit, watch YouTube, message, and deal with a ton of email. You will absolutely get through a day of use with this unless you’re playing PUBG all day.One of the last things I want to focus on here is software. ASUS has a reputation of putting terrible skins on its devices in the past, but I’m happy to report you can pretty much bypass that here on the ROG Phone II.ASUS does give you the option to use its theme, but you can choose stock Android if you like, and that’s what I did during my usage. It felt quite a bit like the Nexus/Pixel experience with some added features.We’ve seen this approach by more and more companies over the last few years. Motorola started the trend and others like OnePlus have picked up the mantle.ASUS let Google focus on the core of Android while putting its focus into features like Armory Crate, which allows you to fine-tune almost every aspect of your device from the clock speed of your processor to hiding notifications while you’re gaming.You can even dial in custom settings depending on which app or game you have open. It’s crazy good and gamers and average users alike will find features in there they love.ASUS also took the time to add in an audio wizard. This is an area that most companies are shying away from, just like how they’re getting rid of the headphone jack. The headphone jack is a feature here on the ROG Phone II and the audio wizard makes sure you get the most out of it. There are a ton of EQ scenes and DTS X spacial audio so you can dial in audio exactly how you want it.My biggest issue with the ASUS ROG Phone II’s software is the unknown. Who knows how many updates this phone will get? Who knows how fast they’ll come?ASUS is not the company you think of when you think of fast updates or long-term support. If those things matter to you, I’d tell you to really do your research first-hand and make sure you’re comfortable with whatever the results are before dropping your money on one of these.If you do decide to pick one up, I think you need to be prepared to be stuck on that software for the duration of the phone’s life.Cameras and pictures are an area where the big boys tend to separate from the other guys. You used to get what you paid for in this area, but then Samsung, Google, and Apple started putting class-leading cameras in their mid-range devices and that all changed. Now, you can get a great photography experience by spending a few hundred dollars less than flagship prices.All that being said, if photography matters to you, you’ll want to grab one of those other devices. That’s not to say the ASUS ROG Phone II has a bad camera, but it’s nowhere near class-leading. Pictures come out cool and the lack of OIS is a real bummer when you’re trying to get that perfect action shot or shoot some video.The ultra-wide camera is a ton of fun but the sharpness is a disappointment. As long as you don’t try to push in too much on these pictures, you’ll enjoy them but once you do, it’s a different story.The most frustrating part for me was the over-sharpening on the main camera. Everyone seems to do it these days, and ASUS isn’t among the worse, but there have been some pictures that could have been better with some better photo processing. Are the pictures still fine for social media and sending to friends and family? Sure. But not much more than that.ConclusionDespite its flaws, I truly believe that the ASUS ROG Phone II was the best phone released in 2019. In fact, I think its still the best buy on the market right now. If you can find one of these used or open-box for the $500-$600 price range, you should absolutely do it.That is to say, as long as you’re comfortable using an absolutely massive phone. I can’t overstate just how big this thing seems in the hand. It’s definitely a two-hander if I’ve ever seen one.I’m not a big phone guy, but I don’t mind it here. It’s allowed ASUS to pack in a ton of stuff I love like a 6,000mAh battery that supports reverse charging (but not wireless charging), a 120Hz AMOLED display with 240Hz touch-sampling and HDR10, amazing front-facing speakers, and a headphone jack.I’d say this is a phone you can buy and use for years upon years as long as you’re comfortable with the software situation. I never felt a slowdown nor did I see any stuttering when using the device and I used it for well over a month. It’s flawless in that regard. Even with apps getting bigger and demanding more processor resources, I still think that the ROG Phone II will keep up with newer devices many years down the road.The ASUS ROG Phone II is one of my favorite Android devices of all time and I can’t recommend it enough.

Review: The Lockly Vision is everything your front door needs in one device

There's no reason to install two separate smart devices on your porch when the Lockly Vision has everything you need.When

Review: POCO M2 Pro is a Redmi Note 9 Pro clone that ditches the ads

The POCO M2 Pro is a Redmi Note 9 Pro with a slightly different design, ad-free MIUI, and 33W fast

Review: Wireless charging adds little value to the Fire HD 8 Plus tablet

You have to fit into a specific niche to buy this tablet.This spring, Amazon refreshed its Fire HD 8 tablet

Poco F2 Pro Review

Android has become the lion share of the smartphone market. The operating system is literally the biggest software project in the world and is installed on over 2.5 billion devices globally. With that, there always seems to be new competition from numerous companies. One such company is Poco, and its latest is the flagship F2 Pro.With the F2 Pro, Poco wants to find a balance between market price and premium experience. This is not an unfamiliar story previously portrayed by OnePlus, Nokia, and Motorola in the past. Even so, let’s take a deep dive into the F2 Pro to see how well it finds that middle ground for consumers.DesignThe industrial build of the Poco F2 Pro is strikingly good. If you stripped the branding, you could easily convince me this was built by Samsung or LG. Honestly, the overall design to me is like the OnePlus 7T and 7 Pro from last year had a baby. You have the slide up camera (more on this later) and similar lines of the 7 Pro and the back circular camera and flat screen of the 7T. – neither of which is a bad thing.A quick Google search will also show more similarities to OnePlus in that the Poco brand is a direct competitor to OnePlus and is actually a sub-brand of Redmi. OnePlus is a sub-brand of Oppo in China. The F2 Pro is heavily based on the Redmi K30 Pro.The right side of the F2 Pro is flanked by the volume rocker and a metallic red power button. As a Pixel owner, I’m always fond of a colored power button. The left side is completely void of any buttons.Atop the F2 Pro, you have the motorized camera housing and an almost retro 3.5mm headphone jack. Flip the phone upside down and you see one down-firing speaker, the SIM tray, and the USB-C power port.SpecificationsInternally, the Poco F2 Pro is well-powered without overkill. It has a Qualcomm 865 processor, Adreno 650 GPU, and 6GB of RAM. Pair that with 128GB of onboard storage and you are ready for almost any mobile task.The screen is a 6.67-inch AMOLED display with 2,400 x 1,080 resolution. Both the front and back glass are Corning Gorilla Glass 5 and should be able to take a normal regimen of punishment. The refresh rate of the screen is sadly only 60Hz. In the new age of 90Hz-120Hz it’s worth a mention, but not a deal-breaker.I should also note that the Poco F2 Pro does have 5G support, but due to the lack of local options, I was unable to test this feature. Verizon was not an option with the internal radios, but T-Mobile performed well in my time with the phone.What’s omitted? There’s not an official IP rating for water and dust resistance. This is most likely done to lower expenses as the certification process is a paid license.The other missing feature is wireless charging. I’m in the camp that almost any phone above $500 should have this feature.Software and PerformanceThe software on the F2 Pro is a mixed bag for me. While at first glance it looks crisp and colorful, it slowly started to frustrate me. It comes installed with MIUI and adds layers and layers of menus, swipes, and system options that just don’t need to be there. The overlay reminds me of Samsung from a few years back in that it’s just overkill.I get that other people love Samsung, but it hurts the end-users experience when they can’t pick up two phones running Android and have them act the same way. I long for a world where changing phones due to a multitude of reasons such as money, availability, or carriers doesn’t lead users to being lost for weeks in a new UI. 1 of 6 I had very few issues in performance while using the Poco F2 Pro, however. The phone is snappy and performed very well in normal tasks. I saw no lag or stutter in multi-view or switching between apps.The only hiccups I have are that I struggled to find any way to interact with a notification from the lock screen and the notification shade didn’t always want slide down on the first try when using the swipe down gesture on the home screen.My final issue would be the embedded fingerprint sensor on the display. It’s not good. Yes, it will open the phone… eventually. And only most of the time on the first try.This tech still needs to be further brewed on most phones I’ve used with this option, but the Poco is behind in most regards to its peers here.CamerasLet’s start with the rock star of this section: the motorized selfie camera. While it’s the camera I will use the least, it’s the more impressive one. The mechanical engineering around hiding the camera is something that just makes me smile.Being able to tuck away and save screen real estate without notches or pinholes is amazing. And then you throw in the “whoa” factor of having it pop up like submarine periscope is just nerd candy.How does it work? It’s fine. It takes self-absorbed pictures just waiting to be shared on social media. It’s perfectly serviceable.On the flip side, you see a blacked-out circular camera housing four sensors. The main camera lens is a 64-megapixel shooter. This Sony sensor takes pretty good photos. I’d put the standard shots above say a Moto phone but still behind Samsung, Apple, and Google.Portrait mode is also better than average. This mainly due to the fourth sensor being dedicated specifically to depth with 2-megapixels. Images result in a good, sharp photo with nice edge detection and blurring.The macro camera on the Poco is much like most macro cameras in that it works. None that I’ve used have been great and many just… frankly seem like a gimmick. You can take super zoomed-in photos, but most are not great and don’t add much value.The ultra-wide 13-megapixel camera, on the other hand, gave great results that made me wish it were on more phones. Being able to shift from normal to a much wider focus was much more enjoyable than I thought it would be. The resulting photos also didn’t seem to be washed out or over-processed. 1 of 4 Normal camera Ultra-wide Normal camera Ultra-wide Battery lifeThis is one place the Poco F2 Pro excels. With a 4,700mAh power pack, the F2 Pro gave me a full day’s battery life without fail. Some days of less heavy usage, I could get almost two full days before needing to top off the tank.When you do need to reach for a cable there’s a 33-watt charger included in the box. This is great news as the F2 Pro supports fast-charging up to 30-watts. Smart power delivery has seen a nice evolution in recent years, and having quick charging options is a must-have feature in today’s top phones.ConclusionI really like most things about the Poco F2 Pro. It has good hardware, better than average cameras, and a great screen.Unfortunately, I think smartphone users fall under two camps: hardware people and software people. There are shades in between and I fall under the latter of needing software to be a much larger proportion of my experience pie.Despite my reservations, I think many people will find the $529 price tag to be about right. It’s a good alternative to what OnePlus and Moto provide.You can purchase through many avenues, but the most widely available one is Amazon. The F2 Pro can be purchased in Cyber Grey, Electric Purple, Neon Blue, and Phantom White.

Apple Will Allow Developers to ‘Challenge’ App Store Review Guidelines Starting This Summer

Apple today announced that it is launching an online version of its App Store lab, providing developers with another avenue

Latest Reviews

Yes, there’s a “Netflix for sleep” and it has hundreds of hours of content

We live in a time where a lot of startups pitch themselves as a “Netflix for ___” or an “Uber for ____” business. This is the era of subscriptions, services, side hustles and the gig economy.When it comes to subscriptions and streaming services, a lot of people think of music and video. And that’s where Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime reign supreme.As nice as it is to fall asleep to your favorite shows or movies, it’s not exactly the best stuff for your brain. If you’re honest with yourself, you know you could do better when it pertains to getting quality rest. And it starts with proper sleep.Instead of trying to unwind with a new episode of “The World’s Most Dangerous Prisons”, why not try some guided meditation? Try Restflix, a streaming service designed to help you get more restful sleep and deal with stress.Restflix is helps users fall asleep faster and rest better, and includes 20+ personalized channels with meditative music, bedtime stories, and calming videos.Restflix is not just for sleep, either. Use it throughout your day to unplug or re-center yourself ahead of that next Zoom call or virtual meeting.Watch on all major platforms: Apple TV, iOS, Roku, Android & Fire TVWatch 20+ live channels featuring soothing sounds, bedtime stories, kids, guided meditations & moreUnlimited video & audio w/ no interruptionsHuge variety of Sleep expert-approvedHelps overcome insomnia, tinnitus, night-time anxiety, & lower everyday stressAvailabilityYou can purchase a subscription to Restflix in one, two, and three year options. It normally costs $49 per year if you purchase it direct; however, we’re offering deep discounts to our readers. The longer you subscribe, the bigger the savings!1-year subscription – $29.992-year subscription – $49.993-year subscription – $59.99Best SellersEarn Credits!For every $25 you spend in the AG Deals Store you get $1 credit added to your account. And, if you refer the deal via social media or an email that results in a purchase, you’ll earn $10 credit in your account.First Time Buying?If this is your first time buying, you are also eligible for 10% discount! Just be sure to subscribe for email updates.Free StuffNot looking to spend any money today? No worries. You can still visit the AndroidGuys section for freebies and pick something anyhow.

Vissles-M Monitor review

If you’ve ever used multiple screens for your work PC, you know just how beneficial it can be to your productivity. Being able to monitor emails or social media without switching between tabs is really convenient. The same goes for working on a document with source material on a second screen.While it’s not entirely uncommon to have two screens for the home or office computer, you certainly don’t see that very often with laptops. Nobody has perfected an affordable portable experience with two screens.It’s possible, of course, to plug your laptop or Chromebook into a hub/dock or to simply connect to a monitor as needed. That’s nice and all, but the screen takes up space and it’s not something you can take with you on the road.The Vissles-M ($199), is a portable 15.6-inch display that connects to your computer, laptop, and other devices. It also allows for touch, and that’s pretty damn cool, if not something you get in a traditional monitor.With two USB Type-C ports and one mini-HDMI port, it plugs into your gaming consoles (Xbox, PS4, Nintendo Switch) and Android phones. Indeed, it allows for you to put a screen where you normally wouldn’t, bringing about new levels of productivity or entertainment.There is also a 3.5mm headphone jack which comes in handy should you find yourself working in a coffee shop; built-in speakers are located at the bottom.The Vissles-M is an IPS panel with a non-glare surface and a contrast ratio of 800:1. Its resolution is 1920 x 1080, which should be on par with your standard laptop screen.Included in the box are a number of cables, which we certainly appreciate. It’s nice not having to hunt down a USB-C-to-USB-C cable or a mini-HDMI cable just to get going.The display has a magnetic protective cover that keeps the screen from getting scratches. It’s also this cover that becomes the stand to prop it up. We found it does well with varying angles for different viewing perspectives.The whole thing weighs in about 1.5-pounds so it travels very well. And because it’s ultra-thin, you can put it in the same bag as your laptop without notice.We’d be remiss if we didn’t talk about the overall picture, it is a monitor after all. Brightness is contrast is good, but you’ll want to plug into a power source if you can.We didn’t get above 65 percent before our unit wanted to power off. Plugging in a second USB-C cable into the wall let us get all the way up to 100. With that said, we do appreciate when we’re able to adjust the image based on environmental or situational needs.The picture is clear and has a nice contrast, and we found it has good viewing angles. There’s something in the non-glare coating that gives it a bit of a dull or flat effect. It’s not terrible, and really only makes itself obvious when contrasting to your laptop or other screens. If you’re using it for watching videos or gaming, you’ll probably be happy with the image.We paired ours up with an entry-level Chromebook for a few weeks and came away feeling like the image was nearly identical. Stick it with a Pixelbook or something premium, though, and you’ll see the difference.This isn’t a gaming monitor, to be sure. Don’t buy this for that aspect or you’ll come away less than pleased. The real demographic here is someone who might need to boost productivity from time to time. Whether that means duplicating/sharing their screen, engaging in Slack or Zoom chats while working on a document, or blowing through emails, it works well.We had mixed results when using our phones as the Vissles-M mirrors your handset but doesn’t allow for touch. It doesn’t fill the screen and the image sits vertically in the middle. The only real use case we can see here might be for sharing your screen with someone else, and even then that’s not great.We’d love to be able to open up email in a tablet-like experience. At a minimum we’d like to be able to rotate the image to better fill the screen.We’ve enjoyed having this on the standing desk as it makes working from a laptop more practical and efficient. It largely stays put around the office, but we’ve found it fun to take with us for a little bit of downtime. Getting in some Paper Mario on the Nintendo Switch is a a unique experience when you can do it tabletop at the park or on the back deck.Learn more about the Vissles-M at the Vissles website where it’s also available for purchase. Pick yours up for about $200 right now.

Sony Xperia 1 II review: Stand out from the crowd

Sony uses its expertise in cameras, screens, and design on the desirable and unusual, but rather niche, Xperia 1 II.

Boost Mobile calls up three new entry-level rate plans

Boost Mobile on Monday introduced three new entry-level plans for consumers who may need to stick to a tight budget. The trio include unlimited talk and text with varying degrees of high speed data.Boost Mobile already has two rate plans which cost less than $50, a 10GB ($35) and $45 (15GB). With the addition of the new options Boost subscribers now have five choices under $50.$10 – Unlimited talk, text, and 1GB data$15 – Unlimited talk, text, and 2GB data$25 – Unlimited talk, text, and 5GB dataIn addition to the new rate plan, Boost Mobile is also introducing high-speed data add-on packages which can be recurring or one-time usage. Pricing is $5 per gigabyte and is available in one and two gigabyte options.SEE: Boost Mobile Buyer’s GuideBoost Mobile does have a pair of unlimited data plans which cost $50 and $60 per month. The difference between the two being the former includes 12GB mobile hotspot while the latter has 30GB hotspot and unlimited HD video streaming.Boost recently launched a new $hrink-It! plan which starts out at $45 per month and includes 15GB data. Customers who pay their bill on time three months receive a $5 discount on their plan. Do it again, and Boost will shave another $5 off each month, putting it at just $35 per month after six total on-time payments.