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This is how Android 13 looks on Windows 11

Many tech brands are currently sharing previews of their upcoming software. Microsoft’s Windows 11 is in its final stages of Windows Insider previews before the public build is released. Google recently shared the first developer preview of its Android 13 software. Now, developers are showing what it looks like when you blend the two.

Android web and app developer Danny Lin showcased his porting skills by running Windows 11 on his Google Pixel 6 via a virtual machine, after having updated the device to Android 13 Developer Preview 1.

And here's Windows 11 as a VM on Pixel 6 https://t.co/0557SfeJtN pic.twitter.com/v7OIcWC3Ab

— kdrag0n (@kdrag0n) February 13, 2022

Lin claimed to have a “really usable” experience after tweaking the processing power on his own. However, graphics acceleration is not supported on the Pixel 6. He also demonstrated playing the video game Doom on the virtual machine, to further show its capabilities.

As a seasoned developer, Lin has also tested other software, such as Linux on the Pixel 6. However, these skills might not be up to the skills of a standard user.

Being able to run foreign systems on devices is an interesting but not uncommon practice in the developer space. As many brands realize how such features can benefit their businesses, they have begun to update their hardware and software accordingly. Wccftech noted that Android 13 on the Pixel 6 supports virtualization and that Google appears to be working on its virtualization framework overall.

Microsoft recently announced a partnership with Samsung, which will pair recent Windows operating systems with Samsung’s One UI Android customization. In particular, the software integration allows the “Your Phone” icon in the System Tray on the Windows desktop to showcase the last three recently accessed applications on a Samsung phone. Users can select the icons and project the application on the desktop that is running natively on the smartphone. The feature is probably as close to a branded virtual machine as we’ll ever get.

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