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The biggest ultrawide monitors in 2020

Sometimes bigger is better, especially when it comes to monitors. Wider spaces translate to better productivity and more immersive gaming. Although the best ultrawides offer something else besides sheer size, if you want the biggest display you can buy, these monitors have what you need. Whether you like the Samsung CHG90 or the Acer Nitro display, these ultrawide monitors are gargantuan and are real head-turners at home or in the office.

Whether you’re a gamer, a video editor, or just someone who wants a super-wide display without the annoying bezels and wires, there’s an ultrawide on this list just for you.

The biggest ultrawide monitors

  • Samsung CHG90
  • Asus ROG Strix XG49VQ
  • Acer Nitro EI491CRP
  • LG 49WL95C
  • Alienware AW5520QF

Samsung CHG90

Riley Young/Digital Trends

Samsung’s big pitch is that this ultrawide is based on Quantum dot technology. It’s still an LCD monitor, but it uses light-emitting nanocrystals — Quantum dots — that absorb and convert light. Their size determines the color they produce, as larger particles gravitate to red while smaller particles shift towards green. The result is rich colors, deep blacks, and true white. They’re typically applied in a sheet over the LED backlight.

This Samsung ultrawide supports 1.07 billion colors. It also sports a 1,800R curve while packing a maximum 144Hz refresh rate even at its default 3,840 x 1,080 resolution. There’s even HDR, a 1ms response time, a 3,000:1 contrast ratio, and a 350-nit maximum brightness. For ports, it includes two HDMI, one Mini DisplayPort, one DisplayPort, two USB-A ports, and audio jacks. It supports AMD’s FreeSync 2 technology as well for tear-free frame rates.

If you can wait a little longer for a more premium version, the Odyssey G9, should debut in the first half of 2020 packing a narrower 1,000R curve, a 1,000-nit maximum brightness, a 5,120 x 1,400 resolution, a 240Hz max refresh rate, and Nvidia’s G-Sync technology.

Read our full Samsung CHG90 review

Asus ROG Strix XG49VQ

Here’s a good solution for PC gamers on either side of the Radeon-GeForce spectrum. It’s an Adaptive-Sync panel that falls under Nvidia’s “G-Sync Compatible” banner for the GTX 10, GTX 16, and RTX 20 GPUs while also supporting AMD’s FreeSync 2 HDR technology. It’s an HDR 400-class display too, meaning it meets specific criteria to receive VESA’s DisplayHDR certification.

This ultrawide has a native 3,840 x 1,080 resolution at 144Hz and a 1,800R curve. It sports a 3,000:1 contrast ratio, a response time of 4ms, a 450-nit maximum brightness, and supports 1.07 billion colors. For ports, it includes two HDMI, one DisplayPort, an audio jack, two USB-A ports, and one USB-B port that connects directly to your PC.

If you need something smaller, the ROG Strix XG43VQ is a 43-inch version with a 3,840 x 1,200 resolution, 120Hz refresh rate, and FreeSync Premium Pro. It’s also listed on Nvidia’s “G-Sync Compatible” list.

Acer Nitro EI491CRP

What’s interesting about Acer’s ultrawide is that it provides three HDMI ports: One supporting v2.0 and two supporting v1.4. The big difference between the two is bandwidth, as the older spec handles 4K video at 30 frames per second (FPS) while the newer spec handles 4K video at 60 fps. We provide a chart listing the differences between the two along with information about the upcoming v2.1 spec launching in 2020. This ultrawide also includes one DisplayPort connector but no audio jack.

The Nitro EI491CRP has a native 3,840 x 1,080 resolution at 120Hz, though you can overclock the refresh rate to 144Hz. It also has a 3,000:1 contrast ratio, a 4ms response time, and a 1800R curvature. It’s an HDR 400-class display, with HDR support and a 400-nit maximum brightness. Unlike the first two on our list, it only handles 16.7 million colors, but it does support AMD’s FreeSync 2 technology for tear-free PC or console gaming.

If you want something smaller, Acer’s Predator X34 packs a 34-inch screen with a 3,440 x 1,440 resolution. You can overclock its refresh rate up to 100Hz.

LG 49WL95C

If you need connectivity, this ultrawide has plenty. In addition to the USB-B port that connects to your PC, this panel provides one DisplayPort, two HDMI, and a headphone jack. It also includes four USB-A ports and a single USB-C port, the latter of which allows you to connect another display, charge a laptop, or transfer data to and from your PC. That said, this ultrawide mainly targets professionals, photographers, and digital artists who need an extremely large digital workspace.

LG’s ultrawide provides a 5,120 x 1,440 resolution at a maximum 60Hz refresh rate. It supports HDR 10 but doesn’t fall within VESA’s DisplayHDR certification due to the panel’s 350-nit maximum brightness. Other features include support for 1.07 billion colors, a 5ms response time, and a 1,000:1 contrast ratio. Unfortunately, it doesn’t support adaptive synchronization technologies like Freesync and GSync.

If you want something smaller, read our review of the LG 34WK95U-W. At 34 inches diagonally, it offers a 5,120 x 2,160 resolution, HDR, and Thunderbolt 3 connectivity.

Alienware AW5520QF

Rather than stretch the screen out to the sides as far as it can go, this Alienware model has a different idea: Make a 55-inch computer monitor that’s about the size of modern HDTV, but designed to be a monitor with 4K resolution, extra-low input latency, a 0.5ms response time, and a 120Hz refresh rate.

Ports for this monster include three HDMI 2.0, a single DisplayPort 1.4, four USB-A, a USB-C power delivery port, and SPDIF out.

Essentially, you’ll be getting the best of both worlds: You’ll have a crystal-clear entertainment display system, but also an impressive monitor for gaming whenever you want it. This makes the Alienware an especially good choice for households that limit themselves to only one screen in the home. Be careful about how you set this one up though — you could actually be wasting screen space if you’re too close to it.

For those who do like the idea of using this model as a central entertainment system, it comes with a remote control for easier management from afar.

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Razer Kishi Controller review: Xbox Edition

As a longtime console gamer, mobile games have never appealed to me much. I’ve always preferred the types of games released on console and playing on a larger screen. However, with the recent introduction of cloud gaming, one of those topics has resurfaced, but in a new way.While cloud gaming doesn’t have me prepared to ditch the console anytime soon, that doesn’t mean I don’t want to at least check it out. In order to make the most of the experience, you’re going to need a good controller. That’s where the Razer Kishi (~$100 USD) comes into play.There are plenty of other controllers out there to choose from, but the vast majority of them require you to mount your phone. If you’ve ever tried one of these before, you already know how awkward it can be to wield this top-heavy monstrosity.Fortunately, the Kishi mounts your phone right in the center, much like the Nintendo Switch. This layout makes it easier to view all of your buttons and feels much more natural to use while gaming in a variety of positions.DesignIf you’ve ever used a gamepad before, then you won’t be surprised by the design of the Razer Kishi. It features all the basic buttons, including a joystick on the left with a D-pad, and a joystick on the right with four main buttons. There are also two trigger buttons on both the left and the right side. Besides the main buttons, you’ll also find an Xbox button along with a share and menu button.What truly makes the Kishi standout from the crowd is its expandable design and hardwired connection. Thanks to some clever engineering, Razer has managed to make a compact controller for on the go, capable of expanding to hold even some of the widest phones around.I had no issue fitting my 6.2-inch Samsung Galaxy S9+ or a ZTE Axon 10 Pro which measures in at 6.5-inches. A word of warning though, the Kishi does not support the massive Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra.User ExperienceI absolutely loved gaming while using the Razer Kishi, in my opinion, nothing beats this layout. It’s one that has already been a huge hit with the Nintendo Switch, and it works just as well as my Switch, with the added benefit of being more lightweight.Even though this is the Xbox edition of the Kishi, it still works with any game or service with controller support. I personally tried it out with several different games, including Asphalt 9, Dead Cells, PUBG, Call of Duty Mobile, and various emulators. It worked great on all of them, except for PUBG and Call of Duty Mobile, both of which restrict the controllers that can be used.I also spent some time testing it with Stadia and Xbox Game Pass Ultimate. Cloud gaming is what the Kishi was truly built for, and it excels with both of these platforms. So much so, that I can’t imagine using any other controller with these services, nothing beats this layout with the phone comfortably placed in the center. It feels so balanced and works great at every angle.The buttons all worked perfectly, and I was more than satisfied with the travel and lack of latency thanks to the hardwired connection. I did find the left and right trigger buttons to be a little springy and mushy compared to other console controllers though.However, not everything is perfect on the Kishi. For starters, I had some minor issues when trying to close it back up into its compact form. It seemed to work best when I turned it over and looked at the back side, otherwise, I had issues trying to get everything lined up properly.Next, I found on several occasions that it had completely drained the battery while staying connected to my idle phone. This happened a handful of times when I left my fully charged phone with the Kishi connected, only to find it completely dead when I returned 16-24 hours later ready to play some games.For comparison, without the Kishi connected, my phone will only have lost 12-16% of its charge in the same time period. I quickly learned not to leave the Kishi attached and to only connect it when I was ready to play.I was also disappointed that the Kishi lacked Bluetooth support. I would have loved to use the Kishi in its closed up form as a regular Bluetooth controller with my tablet or other devices. Specifically, I would have enjoyed using it with my Chromebook or laptop while using cloud gaming services. It would really make the Kishi a much better investment and more versatile if it could be used with other devices besides your phone.Finally, the USB-C port on the Kishi only works for charging. It is not possible to connect a USB-C to 3.5mm headphone adapter or to even use a pair of USB-C headphones. That’s a pity, because having low latency for your audio is often just as important as having that same trait in your controller.Although I can understand the challenges here, USB-C audio has been a mess on phones since its introduction, but Bluetooth audio latency is still a huge issue for mobile gamers.Fortunately, there are some low latency Bluetooth headphones out there such as the Razer Hammerhead True Wireless Earbuds that help address this problem.Speaking of audio, the Kishi sports a couple of vents on the right side to help channel audio from bottom-firing speakers. That way your games won’t sound muffled while being covered up with the gamepad.Final ThoughtsAs much as I love this controller and want to recommend it to everyone, $100 is a lot to ask. For $60 you can get a PS4 or Xbox controller that works with Android 10 phones, not to mention the numerous other cheaper alternatives. Unfortunately, the form factor alone cannot justify such a high price tag.That makes the Razer Kishi more of a luxury product, nice to have, but too expensive for most people. If they were to add Bluetooth and cut the price in half, then it would be a must-have for any mobile gamer. Still, if you can afford it, and don’t mind the minor drawbacks, I highly recommend it. And if you’re looking to save a little money the regular edition of the Razer Kishi can be purchased for $80, and it is literally the same controller without the Xbox branding.Razer Kishi Xbox EditionBuy from Amazon Buy from RazerRazer KishiBuy from Amazon Buy from Razer