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Home News The best Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 2 cases and covers

The best Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 2 cases and covers

Samsung is taking strong steps toward a foldable future with the Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 2 — an updated foldable phone that takes everything we loved about the first-generation Galaxy Fold and adds some modern style with a bezel-less front screen, punch-hole selfie cameras, and an improved hinge system. But getting your hands on the future doesn’t come cheap, and the Galaxy Z Fold 2 starts from an eye-watering $2,000.

At that price, you’re unlikely to want to leave your foldable phone open to the elements, so you should absolutely invest in a case to make sure your futuristic phone makes it to, well, the future. Here are some of the best Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 2 cases we’ve found.

Spigen Ultra Hybrid Case

Samsung has really gone all in on its color schemes recently, and Mystic Bronze is the must-have color for new Galaxy smartphones — and that’s no different where the Galaxy Z Fold 2 is concerned. You definitely want to show that color (and your $2,000 phone) off, but you also want to protect your phone, so what do you do? Grab a clear case, that’s what. Spigen’s Ultra Hybrid is a gorgeous clear case that uses a crystal clear polycarbonate back to show off your phone, while also keeping it protected. A TPU bumper adds a bit of drop resistance, and raised bezels allow your phone to rest safely on surfaces. Unfortunately, there’s no spine protection, but it’s still great everyday protection regardless.

Slickwraps Deep Space Skin

Folded up, the Galaxy Z Fold 2 is something of a thick device, so you may be hesitant to add extra bulk onto it with a case. Thankfully, that’s where skins come in. The Deep Space skin from Slickwraps puts the galaxy back into your Galaxy phone, adding a starfield effect to the outside of your phone. It’s easy to apply and remove, and the vinyl material feels good in the hand. It’s sleek and slim, but it’s worth pointing out you won’t get too much protection from a skin. It’ll add resistance to scratches, dirt, and fingerprints, but drops will still be just as dangerous.

Official Samsung Leather Cover Case

Nothing says “executive chic” like leather, and Samsung’s official leather cover is the perfect choice if you’re looking for a case that makes a statement. It’s made from sumptuous genuine calfskin leather, and it provides excellent grip and a good amount of protection, without adding a huge amount of thickness to your device. The cover clips onto each separate part of the Z Fold 2, but doesn’t cover the spine, which is unfortunate given it costs a pretty expensive $80. Still, if you want your case to complement your style, it’s hard to beat this.

$79 from Mobile Fun

Spigen Tough Armor Case

This is the second Spigen case on our list, and frankly, we’ve included it because how could we not? The Tough Armor case is a proven winner, and its combination of TPU and polycarbonate is sure to protect your phone against a variety of threats. It has a reinforced kickstand so you can prop your phone up to watch videos, and it has raised edges to protect your camera lenses and displays from dirt and grit. Again, it’s not the cheapest option out there, but it does come with scratch protection for the Galaxy Z Fold 2’s spine. It looks great, and protects very well.

UAG Civilian Series Case

If you’re looking for more serious drop protection, then UAG’s store is the place to go. The Civilian case series may sound as if it’s more casual than UAG’s usual fare, but it absolutely isn’t. The more casual style and design are backed up with some serious protection UAG is calling “HyperCush.” According to UAG, HyperCush is a combination of two shock-absorbing materials, layered together with a hexagon pattern. Together, this creates a strong drop resistance that absorbs the energies of an impact, stopping it from damaging your phone. There’s also spine protection built in, giving you all-around protection. It’s not cheap, but neither was your phone, so it’s definitely worth the money.

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Nest Audio review

One of my favorite aspects of having a connected home is the ever-present smart speaker. I’m all-in on Google Assistant and appreciate having its capabilities in nearly every room of my house.What started with the Google Home back in 2016 has evolved and iterated internally and through partnerships with other hardware brands.Google’s own devices have gone through a few changes, perhaps most notably switching from the Google brand to the Nest brand. Moreover, it has expanded from a single speaker to a number of options, including some with displays.The newest member of the Google and Nest family, the Nest Audio, arrives in time for the all-important fourth quarter buying season. Priced just $99.99, its closest counterpart is the original Google Home.Having spent around five days with the Nest Audio, and getting a good sense of its capabilities, I’m ready to share my review.DesignThe Nest Audio looks right at home in Google’s 2020 portfolio; the unassuming and modern design looks good in any environment. Sold in five colors, you’ll find the speaker in charcoal, chalk, sky, sand, and sage.Similar to the Nest Mini, the Nest Audio is made from sustainable fabric that comes from plastic bottles. For every one speaker sold it offsets 1.2 plastic bottles.The Nest Audio resembles a large bar of soap standing on edge. It’s a dense unit to be sure, and weighs more than expected.SoundI’ve only had the Nest Audio in place for a few days, but I can attest that it sounds terrific. It gets loud and has no problem filling a room with music. In fact, I’ve already considered taking it out of the office to take it home. Given the proximity of other building tenants I’ll never get the chance to play it at maximum volumes.One of the first things I came to appreciate is how good it sounds at low volume levels. If you turn music down in a car or with a standard speaker, you’ll likely only hear highs and vocals.I love Paul Oakenfold, Pink Floyd, Run the Jewels, and R.E.M. but none of them sounds all that good when you’re only getting the upper range. Really, it can sound annoying when you’re just hearing parts of cymbals, guitar, and/or synths.Music begs to be listened to at loud volume levels but that’s not always possible. You can’t crank it when doing the dishes when other family members are just a room away. And just like crappy Wi-Fi, sometimes it’s better when you don’t even bother.The Nest Audio is a different experience. I’m finding that everything sound crisp, clear, and even, regardless of volume. Lows are represented with bass showing up in all genres of music. It’s hard to express just how much that means to me.The Nest team spent quite a bit of time working on improving the hardware, adding smarter sensors and better speaker components. That’s definitely noticeable as I find the promise of being 75% louder than the Google Home an accurate claim.Likewise, the 50% bass boost is also apparent when you turn it up to loud levels. There’s a difference between loud bass and clear bass; the Nest Audio has both.What Else?The Nest Audio is also packed with software features and smarts. Take for instance the Media EQ which adapts to the content you’re listening to and adjusts audio settings even if only slightly. It may be a placebo effect or me looking for it, but I think audiobooks sound different than music. The sound profile is just… different.Ambient EQ, another setting, works on the fly and makes it easier to hear your Google Assistant, podcast, or news in noisier environments or where spoken word might be harder to discern.There’s also a dedicated machine learning chip tucked inside. Add to that Google Assistant and you’ve got an incredibly smart speaker that learns from you and your usage.The Nest Audio can be paired with another unit to create a true stereo sound. Similarly, you can group it with other Nest devices and TV (via Chromecast) to provide sound throughout the house.The buttons aren’t obvious at first blush, but they don’t take all that long to learn. The Google Home app does a good job of showing where they are and how they work. If you’ve used a Nest Mini, you’re already hip to it.For those worried about their speaker listening in on every conversation, or for those who don’t necessarily need the voice commands, there is a physical mute button on the rear. Toggling it flashes orange lights on the front, giving you a visual confirmation of the setting.ConclusionI was sold on the Google Home ($129) when it launched in 2016. I still am. The speaker still has a prominent placement in my house and I dig the little colors and lights when I call on it.The idea of getting something smarter, louder, and less expensive only makes too much sense. After a few days with the Nest Audio I am happy to report that it’s just as good in practice as it is on paper.I’ve yet to get rid of any Google Home, Google Mini, Nest Mini, or any other devices in my house. I shuffle them around the home, add them to the office, and create different groups.via GoogleThe Nest Audio will likely replace my Nest Hub Max because I don’t need the screen in its current placement, plus the volume levels are nearly identical to me.If you’ve yet to get started with a connected speaker, I would definitely recommend starting with the Nest Audio. It’s priced right, fills any room with a quality sound that’s natural and consistent, and looks cool, too.AvailabilityThe Nest Audio is available for $99.99 in Google’s Store and through other retailers across the US, Canada, and India. Look for it at retail stores like Target and Best Buy and in 21 countries starting October 15.

Google Nest Audio review: The smart speaker for anyone

Get cozy and nestle up with Google’s latest smart speaker.

The new Amazon Echo has a slight audio edge over the Nest Audio

Smarter, faster, clearerAmazon Echo (4th Gen)$100 at Amazon$100 at Best BuyProsFaster Alexa voice processing than previous EchosSlightly larger woofer and