It engeneer talking by phone at network room

It engeneer talking by phone at network roomRecent IT security breaches herald the devastation that can befall a company when someone gains unauthorized access to a company’s sensitive data. The enterprises affected by these breaches experienced significant losses in terms of recovery costs, market capitalization and brand damage, according to Vick Vaishnavi of Forbes.

In response to these drastic effects, IT departments across the nation are ramping up the processes that govern user access and enhance security. Take a look at the ways IT is protecting big business from security threats:

Better Tools. Network traffic flow analysis tools break down incoming traffic data, including a location’s origin. If Capital Processing Network, a credit card processing company operating in the United States, sees a slew of traffic from overseas users, there’s a chance its valuable data is under attack. Traffic flow analysis tools alert IT managers to potentially dangerous inconsistencies.

IT Asset Management. More than ever, IT departments are reducing and controlling the costs and risks associated with purchasing and leasing hardware and software. One tool of the trade is PC inventory software, which offers IT managers a unified look at all their technology assets, complete with details of each device and the software it runs. Many inventory software providers offer real-time reporting on software updates, so a bug or virus won’t get into the system without triggering a notification.

A Different Approach. Most new employees are already drowning in a sea of paper. Don’t add to this by simply handing them a “20-page dossier” of your IT security policies and procedures and expect them to read and retain it, advises Dominic Saunders of NETconsent. Instructional videos and interactive training provide a multi-sensory learning experience that’s more likely to be understood and followed. By making IT security training accessible for the average professional, tech-illiterate employees will better learn IT-security red flags and pitfalls.

IT Risk Management. Hackers are getting more precise with their attacks, so IT managers need to rethink their strategies. IT risk management sets up a defense based on potential risk. Why pay $1,000 to protect the company directory when customer data is sealed behind outdated security software? IT risk management moves past the outdated blanket security techniques to lock up the most valuable company data.

This well-rounded approach enables IT departments to improve their security across the board, not just make technology-based improvements in individual areas. IT security isn’t just about cool security tricks, but in obtaining and applying a broad-ranged awareness of the dangers swirling around their data. When IT departments integrate these practices, businesses can have a better understanding of how to combat security threats. Consistent IT security is dependent on innovation and a healthy respect for the continually evolving hackers who threaten their data.